Last Thursday in Warsaw, Poland, President Trump delivered one of the most inspiring and iconic speeches of his presidency to the people of Poland. It was a powerful message of the unity and strength in our shared Western values.

Poland, a strong and loyal NATO ally, was the president’s first stop on his latest international trip. The president addressed the Poles just before attending the G20 Summit in Germany.

In this address, President Trump stated:

We have to remember that our defense is not just a commitment of money, it is a commitment of will.  Because as the Polish experience reminds us, the defense of the West ultimately rests not only on means but also on the will of its people to prevail and be successful and get what you have to have.  The fundamental question of our time is whether the West has the will to survive.  Do we have the confidence in our values to defend them at any cost?  Do we have enough respect for our citizens to protect our borders?  Do we have the desire and the courage to preserve our civilization in the face of those who would subvert and destroy it?

According to Heritage’s leading expert on transatlantic relations, Nile Gardiner, President Trump’s recent trip was a success. He notes that Trump has soundly rejected “the disastrous ‘leading from behind’ approach of his predecessor,” and that during this trip he successfully advanced the following themes:

  • A robust defense of Western civilization, NATO, and the transatlantic alliance,
  • A determination to stand up and defeat those forces that threaten the West,
  • A firm belief in the principles of national sovereignty and self-determination, and
  • A commitment to key bilateral partnerships that advance U.S. interests and strengthen the free world.

Gardiner goes on to describe President Trump’s address:

His speech in Warsaw’s Krasinski Square on Thursday was by far the best he has given so far on the international stage. Trump’s Warsaw address, which was a powerful defense of Western civilization and the values that underpin it, was one of the most significant foreign policy speeches delivered by a U.S. leader since the days of Ronald Reagan.

Read Gardiner’s full analysis of Trump’s latest international trip >>

Regarding President Trump’s involvement in the actual speechwriting process, a New York Times article reports:

Mr. Trump labored for hours on the wording in the address — widely praised as one of his most ideologically coherent by the conservative press … The speech had the sledgehammer directness of a Trump campaign address … It was the president himself who inserted the element of defiance, dictating the line “The West will never be broken!” to Mr. Miller, according to a senior White House official involved in the process.

Watch President Trump’s full address below:

What do you think about President Trump’s Warsaw address?

Last Wednesday, Cully Stimson appeared before the Senate Armed Services Committee for his confirmation hearing to be the next General Counsel of the Department of the U.S. Navy.

Stimson is a Senior Legal Fellow at The Heritage Foundation, Manager of the National Security Law Program, and currently the Chief of Staff for Dr. Ed Feulner. A widely recognized expert in national security, homeland security, crime control, drug policy, and immigration, Stimson is regarded as highly qualified for this position. His wealth of experience also notably includes serving as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Detainee Affairs under President George W. Bush, and over two decades of service in the Navy, where he served three tours on active duty as an officer in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps (JAG) and in the reserves where he holds the rank of Captain.

Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke introduced Stimson, his friend and former Navy shipmate, at the hearing. Giving Stimson high praise, Zinke said:

Cully Stimson is the epitome of professionalism. He has superb judgment and above all demonstrates a commitment to excellence…I can find no better person to represent the Navy’s interests as General Counsel.

The General Counsel of Navy is is the chief legal officer of the Department of the Navy and is the head of the Office of the General Counsel, the second largest civilian law firm in the federal government.

In his opening statement, Stimson explained the experience he brings to this position:

The national security challenges to our nation span the globe. From non-state actors to rogue states, the threats to our country and our allies are ever-present, ever-changing, and more complex than ever. That holds true for the legal challenges facing the Department of the Navy as it navigates the world of today. Confronting these challenges has been my life’s work. Everything that I have done in my professional life as a prosecutor, national security analyst, strategist, businessman, and military judge has been preparation for this role.

The next step is for the Senate Armed Services Committee to vote to confirm the nomination.

Please join me in congratulating Cully on his nomination as General Counsel to the Department of the U.S. Navy. 

“Drain the swamp!” It was the battle cry of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.

Many Republican members of Congress echoed that call as well, riding it to victory—and control of both legislative chambers.

The American people rallied around the cry because it reinforced their impression of what Washington had become: a swamp infested with special-interest groups and power-hungry bureaucrats.

They rallied, too, because it held the promise of getting our country back on track—by reforming the tax code, repealing Obamacare, cutting spending, and eliminating the needless red tape that stifles entrepreneurship and innovation.

But more than five months into the new Congress and the new administration, precious little draining has occurred. The delay in action is not only frustrating, it’s expensive: With the promised reforms, the U.S. could have created as much as $5 billion per day in economic output. If nothing changes, the swamp will end up costing more than 2 million prospective jobs over the next decade.


>>>Join the fight to drain the swamp 


Elites argue that piles of regulations and special rules keep everyone safe. But most Americans understand that these policies serve mainly to enrich special interests and keep upstart entrepreneurs from gaining a foothold.

All the regulation keeps new businesses from offering innovative goods and services at lower prices.

All too often, these regulatory schemes not only fail to protect consumers—they create huge problems, like financial crises and housing busts. And then the elites point to the problems as proof of the need for even further governmental intervention.

The bailouts lead to new programs and federal agencies and, of course, even more rules.

But most Americans don’t want more government. Rather, they want relief from big government so that they can make their own decisions and improve their own communities.

There is plenty of evidence that people thrive more under limited government than under a vastly more intrusive government.

Had the U.S. economy simply stayed on the same trend during the Obama years that it had followed over the previous 25 years, gross domestic product per person would be nearly 10 percent higher than it is now.

Instead, after years of ever-expanding government control and regulation, the economy dropped off a cliff in 2008.

Just getting back on the previous trend would be great, but Americans can do much better. At least three major reforms are now possible that can unleash the power of the American economy.

•Repeal Obamacare: A study by the National Center for Policy Analysis estimates that repealing Obamacare would provide a boost to real GDP of more than 1 percent per year over the next decade.

Based on these projections, personal income would increase by hundreds of billions annually, and the economy would add nearly 1 million jobs by the end of the decade.

A simple division by the number of days suggests that the cost of inaction is nearly $500 million per day in lost output. In terms of jobs, this could translate into as many as 250 lost jobs per day (a relatively small number unless one of those jobs is yours).

• Shrink Regulation: Admittedly, this is a herculean task. The federal government has been burdening people with innovation-killing rules for decades, and it is difficult to estimate the economic effects of a broad deregulation effort.

Two Heritage Foundation scholars have estimated the economic impact of reducing just one of the likely effects of Dodd-Frank: excess borrowing costs.

Their study projects that removing these excess costs would grow the GDP by more than 1 percent per year for the next decade, and boost capital stock by nearly 3 percent per year. Inaction on Dodd-Frank costs another $500 million per day.

 Reform the Tax Code: Estimates of tax reform benefits vary widely because there are so many ways to improve the U.S. tax system, but several plans are currently taking shape.

The Tax Foundation studied the House Republican plan and found that it would increase the long-run size of the economy (in terms of GDP) by more than 9 percent. It also projected that the Rubio-Lee plan would grow the economy by 15 percent over the long run.

Trump’s plan is not fully detailed yet, but a decent guess is that the benefits would be somewhere near these projections.

The increase in jobs, wages, and wealth from growing the economy through these types of tax reforms would be enormous. The cost of waiting on just tax reform can be conservatively estimated as approaching $2 billion per day in lost output.

Repealing Obamacare, rolling back the regulatory state, and implementing pro-growth tax reform would be a big shot in the arm to the U.S. economy. Over the next decade, the cumulative effect of making just those three reforms could boost GDP anywhere from $8 trillion to $18 trillion.

That translates to a cost of between roughly $2 billion and $5 billion for each day that Americans are denied these reforms. In terms of lost jobs, waiting costs nearly 1,000 jobs per day.

Some have said that because any legislative action taken this year wouldn’t take effect until at least Jan. 1, 2018, it doesn’t matter if it happens now or in September. False: The sooner investors and entrepreneurs can see the changes on the horizon, the quicker they can begin taking actions that benefit the economy.

A filled swamp is expensive to maintain. The American people are waiting for Congress to drain it. And they should expect their elected representatives to stay in Washington and make the real changes they were elected to do.

This piece originally appeared in The Washington Times


>>>Join the fight to drain the swamp 


Last Thursday, on our member teleconference, Ed Feulner, Mike Needham, and Heritage healthcare expert Bob Moffit discussed the latest in healthcare reform.

On the call, they discussed the state of the Senate healthcare bill, Heritage’s position, and what Heritage Action and Heritage are doing to shape the healthcare debate. Members’ questions covered a wide range of topics and our experts unpacked the specifics in this important discussion.

Listen to a recording of the call here >>

North Korea’s recent launch of a mobile intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) is a troubling milestone. The rogue regime obviously has no plans of quitting its nuclear program, and is increasingly resistant to diplomatic efforts. Heritage expert Bruce Klingner was among the small U.S. delegation present at the most recent diplomatic negotiations with North Korea, held in Sweden.

In a Washington Post report, Klingner had this to say about the negotiations:

We tried repeatedly to ascertain whether any combination of economic and diplomatic benefits or security reassurances could induce Pyongyang (the capital of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) to comply with its previously negotiated commitments and with U.N. resolutions. The answer was an emphatic, unwavering no….

Our North Korean interlocutors presented a stark choice: “First accept us as a nuclear state, then we are prepared to talk about a peace treaty or fight. We are ready for either.”

Klingner goes on to outline Heritage’s recommendation that the Trump administration should strengthen sanctions and impose new ones to make North Korea’s pursuit of nuclear weapons more difficult.

Read Klingner’s full analysis>>

Watch Klingner’s response to North Korea’s ICBM launch on CNN’s “NewsRoom” below:

Thanks to you, Heritage experts have been able to impact the public debate on this vital issue. They have quickly responded to news of North Korea’s latest test through numerous appearances on news networks and through publications. This critical national security threat is certainly a top concern for every American and a priority for us as we work with decision-makers to provide key policy insights going forward.

How do you think the U.S. should respond to North Korea’s growing nuclear program?

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