Best in the Press: May 3 -10

To view the last edition of “Best in the Press”, click here.

Dakota Wood on Venezuela: “We Need to Stay Away From” U.S. Military Intervention

Ana Quintana: Best Prescription to Fix Venezuela is “Get Maduro Out Of Power”

Peter Brookes on Iranian Threat: U.S. Aircraft Carrier “90,000 Tons of Diplomacy and Deterrence”

Nile Gardiner: “Iranian Regime Is Playing With Fire” With Aggression Toward U.S., Allies

Nile Gardiner: “Israel Is Rightly Defending Itself Against Terrorist Aggression”

Dean Cheng: China’s IP Theft, Other Unfair Practices “Almost Baked Into Their System”

 

Adam Michel: This Great Economy Is Benefiting the Poorest Americans
 

Hans von Spakovsky: The FBI Must Answer Major Questions on its Investigation Into the Trump Campaign

Tori Whiting: China Tariffs Strategy Has “Not Borne Fruit,” “Why Would More of the Same Work?”

Kelsey Bolar: Many 2020 Democrats Know Americans Don’t Care about Mueller Report

Kelsey Bolar: Holding AG Barr in Contempt Is “Political Theatre”

Kelsey Bolar: Nobody Deserves to Face Unsubstantiated Claims of Sexual Misconduct

 

Kelsey Bolar Reacts to Poynter List Calling Conservative Sites “Unreliable”

Commentary and Quoteables of the Week:

95 total print mentions and op-eds

Op-Eds:

David Ditch, “Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt,” FOXNews.com

The president wants Congress to come up with a bill that would spend $2 trillion on infrastructure — including roads, bridges, water systems and broadband. That’s a lot of loot, and it shouldn’t come from D.C. The feds already spend too much on infrastructure projects that are not proper national priorities. 

 

John Malcolm, “Mueller Report Fireworks—And It Isn’t Even the Fourth of July,” Federalist Society

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has accused Barr of committing perjury during his April 9 testimony before the House Appropriations Committee. Let’s put this politely.  She will have a tough row to hoe if pursues the allegation. 

 

Jim Carafano, “Trump tries gunboat diplomacy with Iran – Here’s why he’s doing it,” FOXNews.com

Trump is sending Tehran a message: The U.S. may choose to retaliate against Iran for its proxy attacks on our friends and allies. There may even be intelligence on possible Iranian Revolutionary Guard plots to attack U.S. forces in the Middle East. One thing is for certain, there is no slackening in the U.S. resolve to squeeze the boys in Tehran.

 

James Carafano, “North Korean missile test – Here’s the critical thing Trump needs to do now,” Fox News

The smart play now for the U.S. is don’t panic. Keep up the pressure campaign. This not only sends a strong signal to North Korea but also a message to Iran as well: The U.S. won’t concede something for nothing, least of all when the other side pitches a fit.

 

Ed Feulner, “When reality bucks certain Democratic wishes and dreams,” Washington Times

Even as we savor the benefits of a strong economy, this is no time to stand pat. Lawmakers need to keep tax rates and tariffs low. They can start by doing two things above all else. One, make the 2017 tax cut permanent. Second, tame out-of-control spending.

 

Josh Meservey, “Africa’s Sahel region grows as breeding ground for terror, posing critical danger to U.S. and allies,” Washington Times

The Sahel is fast becoming the world’s newest terror hot spot. If swaths of this critical region slip further into chaos — or worse, under Islamist control — then the U.S. and its allies will suffer the consequences into the foreseeable future.

 

Cully Stimson and Hans von Spakovsky, “House Dems show their contempt for the Constitution and the rule of law,” FOXNews.com

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., and his fellow Democrats on the Committee want to hold the attorney general in contempt because he refuses to violate a law passed by Congress.

 

Emilie Kao, “The Federal Bill That Will Sexualize Your Kids, Like It or Not,” Washington Examiner

Congress should not be misled. Treating students and their parents with dignity and respect means allowing them to learn and to live according to their own beliefs about sexual matters. Codifying LBGQT ideology into a civil right would take away fundamental freedoms from those who don’t conform. That’s not equality; it’s injustice.

 

Mike Gonzalez, “Race-Norming in a Maryland Public-School District,” National Review

Is a public school system in a leafy county straddling the Capital Beltway discriminating against Asian Americans? The feds next door are investigating in a case with national implications, and with good reason: The type of racial balancing that Montgomery County Public Schools is using may well be illegal.

 

Jarrett Stepman, “Minimum Wage Will Rise to $5 in 2022. It Might Mean Disaster,” National Interest (taken from Daily Signal)

Minimum wage increases are supposed to be great for low-income workers and a boon to working-class Americans. However, mounting evidence suggests that’s not the case.

 

Hans von Spakovsky, “NY Times publication of Trump tax information violates his legal right to confidentiality,” Fox News

The New York Times no doubt considers it quite a coup to have obtained and published President Trump’s tax return information from 1985 to 1994. But doing so violated Trump’s right under federal law to the confidentiality of his tax returns.

 

Adam N. Michel, “Low-income Americans Benefit Most From Strong Economy,” Los Angeles Times* (via Tribune wire)

Consensus is rare in Washington. And yet even Sen. Bernie Sanders recently admitted “the economy is doing well.” Unfortunately, Sen. Sanders doesn’t seem to understand that deregulation, tax reform, and Washington getting out of the way of businesses and individuals is driving the boom. He’s still describing the 2017 tax cuts as “Trump’s massive tax breaks for billionaires.” Ironically, though, it’s the poorest among us who benefit the most from the rising economic tides (and benefited the most from the tax cuts, for that matter).

 

Robin Simcox, “Let the Terrorists Win?”, The National Interest

That keeping Islamists at bay is somehow “giving the extremists what they want” is a perverse conceit, but it’s been around for years and seemingly gaining credence in some quarters.

 

Jessica Anderson, “For Whom Does the Majority Rule?”, Real Clear Policy

One governing body where the majority rules is the House of Representatives. There, the leaders of the majority party wield tremendous power. And all too often, that power is being used to shut out the minority party. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has repeatedly exercised her power in ways that deny Republican members the opportunity to speak on behalf of the Americans they represent.

 

 

Quoteables:

 

Ana Quintana, Trump team tries to rattle Maduro with military tough talk, Politico

“The administration’s strategy on Venezuela over the past two years had been one of building regional consensus, a policy of incrementalism,” said Ana Quintana, a Latin America analyst at conservative think tank The Heritage Foundation, citing the steady buildup of “incremental sanctions” and support to the opposition.

 

James Carafano, Asylum seekers from 100 countries in detention face shrinking chance of bond, UPI

James Carafano of the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank, views detention as an important “deterrent tool.” Too many immigrants who do not meet the requirements for asylum relief have overburdened the courts and caused a humanitarian disaster, he said.

 

James Carafano, He ‘checks all the blocks’: Pompeo shares a bond with Trump few can claim, Washington Examiner

“Pompeo checks all the blocks,” said Heritage Foundation foreign policy expert James Carafano. “He knows how to talk to Trump. And I think that’s really key.”

 

James Carafano, White House: US Carrier Deployment ‘Unmistakable Message to Iran’, VOA

James Jay Carafano, vice president of the Heritage Foundation’s institute for national security and foreign policy, praised the U.S. move.

 

James Carafano, US Expediting Navy Carrier to Arabian Sea as ‘Unmistakable Message to Iran’, VOA

The vice president of the Heritage Foundation’s Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy praises the U.S. move.

“The U.S. is a global power with global interests and responsibilities,” James Jay Carafano told VOA. “It’s a powerful statement to demonstrate the U.S. is not distracted by a host of challenges in Venezuela, by provocations from North Korea, and yet, the U.S. has the resolve and capacity to show it can stand strong in the Middle East, as well.”

 

James Carafano, The 5G Battle: A Change Of Mind Needed To Win The War, Forbes

Many analysts, such as columnist and legal expert Gordon Chang and the Heritage Foundation’s Jay Carafano, have taken a very aggressive stance against the strategies and actions of the Chinese government and the companies it controls or directs. They use terms as theft and economic warfare to describe what is going on.

 

James Carafano, Democrats are raising alarms about Trump ‘inching’ toward war with Iran, but experts are torn over what happens next, Business Insider

James Carafano, a national security expert at the conservative Heritage Foundation, told INSIDER that the US has “no interest in war” with Iran and “least of all the president.” Carafano said the current plan is meant to “increase pressure “and not to “spark conflict or regime change.”

 

James Carafano, Iran, Venezuela puts spotlight on Trump adviser John Bolton, The Hill

James Carafano, a defense policy expert at the Heritage Foundation who is close with the administration, said Bolton knows his place in the administration and won’t push Trump too far.

 

James Carafano, Trump the diplomatic dealmaker? It’s a tough sell for 2020, Politico

“He isn’t really worried about any of this hurting his 2020 chances. His base thinks it makes him look tough,” said James Carafano, a foreign policy analyst with the conservative Heritage Foundation. “If any of these regimes are foolish enough to escalate and force a U.S. response — again Trump will look tough.”

 

Cully Stimson, Is Barr Trump’s Defense Lawyer?, VOA

“He and he alone as the chief law enforcement officer of the United States was left with the burden and the responsibility to do something after he got that report,” said Charles Stimson, a senior legal fellow at the conservative Heritage Foundation. “I don’t think Attorney General Barr was necessarily saying, ‘I approve of the president’s conduct here.’ “

 

Bruce Klingner, Trump says North Korea weapon test will not derail talks, Financial Times

“Bruce Klingner, another former CIA analyst, said it was difficult to interpret the North Korean move until it was clear what they had launched. He said it was possible the regime had fired conventional rockets from an artillery system — which would be much less provocative that short-range missiles. “While it is tempting to interpret any North Korean military activity as a signal to the United States, that is less clear when short-range conventional force systems are used,” said Mr. Klingner who is at the Heritage Foundation.

 

Bruce Klingner, Kim Jong-un’s move to replace hardline spy chief creates fresh uncertainty in nuke talks, Washington Times

“The individual officials beneath Kim Jong-un are less important than oftentimes people trying to do Kremlinology on the North Korean regime make them out to be,” said former CIA Korea Deputy Division Chief Bruce Klingner, a fellow at The Heritage Foundation.

 

Riley Walters, Donald Trump says China may be waiting for Democratic president to do trade deal, USA Today 

Tariff revenue “is a transfer of wealth from Americans to the government, with new tariffs hitting more consumer goods and lower income households,” said Riley Walters, a policy analyst for Asia’s economy and technology with The Heritage Foundation. “Chinese don’t pay American taxes.”

 

Riley Walters, Reading the tea leaves: What’s behind Donald Trump’s sudden shift in tone on China trade talks?, USA Today

Riley Walters, a policy analyst for Asia’s economy and technology with The Heritage Foundation, said “it’s a little bit difficult to read the tea leaves” when it comes to Trump’s tweet on China tariffs.

 

Riley Walters, Mike Pompeo risks alienating free trade supporters like the Koch network as he pushes Trump’s hard-line trade agenda against China, CNBC

“Regardless of who occupies the White House, the solution to protectionism is not more protectionism, which ultimately results in higher costs for the American people,” said Heritage policy analyst Riley Walters. “The White House should remove these punitive tariffs directed at China.”

 

Riley Walters, ‘We won’t back down.’ Donald Trump talks tough on China trade ahead of high-stakes meeting, Yahoo

Tariff revenue “is a transfer of wealth from Americans to the government, with new tariffs hitting more consumer goods and lower-income households,” said Riley Walters, a policy analyst for Asia’s economy and technology with The Heritage Foundation. “Chinese don’t pay American taxes.”

 

Luke Coffey, China’s Arctic ambitions threaten the West, Pompeo warns in Europe, Washington Examiner

His Monday remarks could foreshadow a U.S. effort “to force China out of the region” before the Communist power establishes a major presence, as the Heritage Foundation’s Luke Coffey put it.

“China is not as involved in the region yet as it is in South Asia or in Africa, so I feel like this is a good example of the administration trying to get ahead of the problem before we go too far down the road,” said Coffey, a former senior special adviser at the United Kingdom’s Ministry of Defence.

 

James Di Pane, Sexual assault epidemic has Pentagon, military leaders on the defensive, Washington Examiner

While acknowledging there are compelling arguments for both sides, Heritage researcher James Di Pane comes down on the side of keeping the dual-hat arrangement, which he says fosters a collaborative relationship, faster decision-making, and more efficient resource allocation.

 

James Di Pane, Pentagon report lays out growing military threats from China, Politico

KEEP THE TWO HATS: The four-star in charge of both U.S. Cyber Command and the National Security Agency should continue having that dual-hatted role, according to a new report from the Heritage Foundation’s James Di Pane.

“Continuing to improve the capacity and readiness of Cyber Command is more important than organizational reshuffling for enhancing cyber security,” he writes.

 

James Di Pane, Trump’s cyber workforce order gets bipartisan praise, Politico

SPEAKING OF CYBERCOM — The four-star in charge of both Cyber Command and the NSA should continue having that dual-hatted role, according to a report from The Heritage Foundation’s James Di Pane. “Continuing to improve the capacity and readiness of Cyber Command is more important than organizational reshuffling for enhancing cyber security,” he writes.

 

Dakota Wood, Marines prep to hit the beach (but need more ships from the Navy), Navy Times

Retired Marine Lt. Col. Dakota Wood, a senior research fellow for the Heritage Foundation, routinely makes the case for more amphib ships and training to prepare the Corps for the near-peer fight.

 

Steve Bucci, The master behind the mask: who is Iran’s most feared and powerful military commander?, Fox News 

“Qassem is little known in the West because he cares nothing for fame or publicity, but everything about power and ideology,” noted Steve Bucci, a visiting fellow at The Heritage Foundation who served for three decades as an Army Special Forces officer and senior Pentagon official. “The Regime loves him; the Iranian people fear him.”

 

Thomas Spoehr, Trump taps Shanahan to be next Pentagon chief, Politico

“My sense is that he’s found his footing and that he’s gotten more comfortable in the role,” said Thomas Spoehr, a retired Army lieutenant general with the conservative Heritage Foundation.

 

Thomas Spoehr, The Pacific push: New rotation, thousands more soldiers heading to the region as the Army readies for a new kind of fight, Army Times

The Army’s push makes sense to retired Army Lt. Gen. Thomas Spoehr, director of the Center for National Defense at The Heritage Foundation.

 

Thomas Calendar, When will the US Navy be able to autonomously seek and destroy mines?,Defense News

But the cuts have been a result, at least in part, of the delays, said Thomas Callender, a retired submarine officer and analyst with The Heritage Foundation.

 

Peter Brookes, US expected to RAMP UP military preparations amid ‘threat of Iranian missile ATTACK’, Express

Military expert Peter Brookes, a senior fellow at the Heritage Foundation, said the threat could have contributed to the military activity from Iran.

 

Commentary and Quoteables of the Week:

95 total print mentions and op-eds

Op-Eds:

 

David Ditch, “Yes to infrastructure, but not if it means $2 trillion in new debt,” FOXNews.com

The president wants Congress to come up with a bill that would spend $2 trillion on infrastructure — including roads, bridges, water systems and broadband. That’s a lot of loot, and it shouldn’t come from D.C. The feds already spend too much on infrastructure projects that are not proper national priorities. 

 

John Malcolm, “Mueller Report Fireworks—And It Isn’t Even the Fourth of July,” Federalist Society

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has accused Barr of committing perjury during his April 9 testimony before the House Appropriations Committee. Let’s put this politely.  She will have a tough row to hoe if pursues the allegation. 

 

Jim Carafano, “Trump tries gunboat diplomacy with Iran – Here’s why he’s doing it,” FOXNews.com

Trump is sending Tehran a message: The U.S. may choose to retaliate against Iran for its proxy attacks on our friends and allies. There may even be intelligence on possible Iranian Revolutionary Guard plots to attack U.S. forces in the Middle East. One thing is for certain, there is no slackening in the U.S. resolve to squeeze the boys in Tehran.

 

James Carafano, “North Korean missile test – Here’s the critical thing Trump needs to do now,” Fox News

The smart play now for the U.S. is don’t panic. Keep up the pressure campaign. This not only sends a strong signal to North Korea but also a message to Iran as well: The U.S. won’t concede something for nothing, least of all when the other side pitches a fit.

 

Ed Feulner, “When reality bucks certain Democratic wishes and dreams,” Washington Times

Even as we savor the benefits of a strong economy, this is no time to stand pat. Lawmakers need to keep tax rates and tariffs low. They can start by doing two things above all else. One, make the 2017 tax cut permanent. Second, tame out-of-control spending.

 

Josh Meservey, “Africa’s Sahel region grows as breeding ground for terror, posing critical danger to U.S. and allies,” Washington Times

The Sahel is fast becoming the world’s newest terror hot spot. If swaths of this critical region slip further into chaos — or worse, under Islamist control — then the U.S. and its allies will suffer the consequences into the foreseeable future.

 

Cully Stimson and Hans von Spakovsky, “House Dems show their contempt for the Constitution and the rule of law,” FOXNews.com

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., and his fellow Democrats on the Committee want to hold the attorney general in contempt because he refuses to violate a law passed by Congress.

 

Emilie Kao, “The Federal Bill That Will Sexualize Your Kids, Like It or Not,” Washington Examiner

Congress should not be misled. Treating students and their parents with dignity and respect means allowing them to learn and to live according to their own beliefs about sexual matters. Codifying LBGQT ideology into a civil right would take away fundamental freedoms from those who don’t conform. That’s not equality; it’s injustice.

 

Mike Gonzalez, “Race-Norming in a Maryland Public-School District,” National Review

Is a public school system in a leafy county straddling the Capital Beltway discriminating against Asian Americans? The feds next door are investigating in a case with national implications, and with good reason: The type of racial balancing that Montgomery County Public Schools is using may well be illegal.

 

Jarrett Stepman, “Minimum Wage Will Rise to $5 in 2022. It Might Mean Disaster,” National Interest (taken from Daily Signal)

Minimum wage increases are supposed to be great for low-income workers and a boon to working-class Americans. However, mounting evidence suggests that’s not the case.

 

Hans von Spakovsky, “NY Times publication of Trump tax information violates his legal right to confidentiality,” Fox News

The New York Times no doubt considers it quite a coup to have obtained and published President Trump’s tax return information from 1985 to 1994. But doing so violated Trump’s right under federal law to the confidentiality of his tax returns.

 

Adam N. Michel, “Low-income Americans Benefit Most From Strong Economy,” Los Angeles Times* (via Tribune wire)

Consensus is rare in Washington. And yet even Sen. Bernie Sanders recently admitted “the economy is doing well.” Unfortunately, Sen. Sanders doesn’t seem to understand that deregulation, tax reform, and Washington getting out of the way of businesses and individuals is driving the boom. He’s still describing the 2017 tax cuts as “Trump’s massive tax breaks for billionaires.” Ironically, though, it’s the poorest among us who benefit the most from the rising economic tides (and benefited the most from the tax cuts, for that matter).

 

Robin Simcox, “Let the Terrorists Win?”, The National Interest

That keeping Islamists at bay is somehow “giving the extremists what they want” is a perverse conceit, but it’s been around for years and seemingly gaining credence in some quarters.

 

Jessica Anderson, “For Whom Does the Majority Rule?”, Real Clear Policy

One governing body where the majority rules is the House of Representatives. There, the leaders of the majority party wield tremendous power. And all too often, that power is being used to shut out the minority party. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has repeatedly exercised her power in ways that deny Republican members the opportunity to speak on behalf of the Americans they represent.

 

 

Quoteables:

 

Ana Quintana, Trump team tries to rattle Maduro with military tough talk, Politico

“The administration’s strategy on Venezuela over the past two years had been one of building regional consensus, a policy of incrementalism,” said Ana Quintana, a Latin America analyst at conservative think tank The Heritage Foundation, citing the steady buildup of “incremental sanctions” and support to the opposition.

 

James Carafano, Asylum seekers from 100 countries in detention face shrinking chance of bond, UPI

James Carafano of the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank, views detention as an important “deterrent tool.” Too many immigrants who do not meet the requirements for asylum relief have overburdened the courts and caused a humanitarian disaster, he said.

 

James Carafano, He ‘checks all the blocks’: Pompeo shares a bond with Trump few can claim, Washington Examiner

“Pompeo checks all the blocks,” said Heritage Foundation foreign policy expert James Carafano. “He knows how to talk to Trump. And I think that’s really key.”

 

James Carafano, White House: US Carrier Deployment ‘Unmistakable Message to Iran’, VOA

James Jay Carafano, vice president of the Heritage Foundation’s institute for national security and foreign policy, praised the U.S. move.

 

James Carafano, US Expediting Navy Carrier to Arabian Sea as ‘Unmistakable Message to Iran’, VOA

The vice president of the Heritage Foundation’s Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy praises the U.S. move.

“The U.S. is a global power with global interests and responsibilities,” James Jay Carafano told VOA. “It’s a powerful statement to demonstrate the U.S. is not distracted by a host of challenges in Venezuela, by provocations from North Korea, and yet, the U.S. has the resolve and capacity to show it can stand strong in the Middle East, as well.”

 

James Carafano, The 5G Battle: A Change Of Mind Needed To Win The War, Forbes

Many analysts, such as columnist and legal expert Gordon Chang and the Heritage Foundation’s Jay Carafano, have taken a very aggressive stance against the strategies and actions of the Chinese government and the companies it controls or directs. They use terms as theft and economic warfare to describe what is going on.

 

James Carafano, Democrats are raising alarms about Trump ‘inching’ toward war with Iran, but experts are torn over what happens next, Business Insider

James Carafano, a national security expert at the conservative Heritage Foundation, told INSIDER that the US has “no interest in war” with Iran and “least of all the president.” Carafano said the current plan is meant to “increase pressure “and not to “spark conflict or regime change.”

 

James Carafano, Iran, Venezuela puts spotlight on Trump adviser John Bolton, The Hill

James Carafano, a defense policy expert at the Heritage Foundation who is close with the administration, said Bolton knows his place in the administration and won’t push Trump too far.

 

James Carafano, Trump the diplomatic dealmaker? It’s a tough sell for 2020, Politico

“He isn’t really worried about any of this hurting his 2020 chances. His base thinks it makes him look tough,” said James Carafano, a foreign policy analyst with the conservative Heritage Foundation. “If any of these regimes are foolish enough to escalate and force a U.S. response — again Trump will look tough.”

 

Cully Stimson, Is Barr Trump’s Defense Lawyer?, VOA

“He and he alone as the chief law enforcement officer of the United States was left with the burden and the responsibility to do something after he got that report,” said Charles Stimson, a senior legal fellow at the conservative Heritage Foundation. “I don’t think Attorney General Barr was necessarily saying, ‘I approve of the president’s conduct here.’ “

 

Bruce Klingner, Trump says North Korea weapon test will not derail talks, Financial Times

“Bruce Klingner, another former CIA analyst, said it was difficult to interpret the North Korean move until it was clear what they had launched. He said it was possible the regime had fired conventional rockets from an artillery system — which would be much less provocative that short-range missiles. “While it is tempting to interpret any North Korean military activity as a signal to the United States, that is less clear when short-range conventional force systems are used,” said Mr. Klingner who is at the Heritage Foundation.

 

Bruce Klingner, Kim Jong-un’s move to replace hardline spy chief creates fresh uncertainty in nuke talks, Washington Times

“The individual officials beneath Kim Jong-un are less important than oftentimes people trying to do Kremlinology on the North Korean regime make them out to be,” said former CIA Korea Deputy Division Chief Bruce Klingner, a fellow at The Heritage Foundation.

 

Riley Walters, Donald Trump says China may be waiting for Democratic president to do trade deal, USA Today 

Tariff revenue “is a transfer of wealth from Americans to the government, with new tariffs hitting more consumer goods and lower income households,” said Riley Walters, a policy analyst for Asia’s economy and technology with The Heritage Foundation. “Chinese don’t pay American taxes.”

 

Riley Walters, Reading the tea leaves: What’s behind Donald Trump’s sudden shift in tone on China trade talks?, USA Today

Riley Walters, a policy analyst for Asia’s economy and technology with The Heritage Foundation, said “it’s a little bit difficult to read the tea leaves” when it comes to Trump’s tweet on China tariffs.

 

Riley Walters, Mike Pompeo risks alienating free trade supporters like the Koch network as he pushes Trump’s hard-line trade agenda against China, CNBC

“Regardless of who occupies the White House, the solution to protectionism is not more protectionism, which ultimately results in higher costs for the American people,” said Heritage policy analyst Riley Walters. “The White House should remove these punitive tariffs directed at China.”

 

Riley Walters, ‘We won’t back down.’ Donald Trump talks tough on China trade ahead of high-stakes meeting, Yahoo

Tariff revenue “is a transfer of wealth from Americans to the government, with new tariffs hitting more consumer goods and lower-income households,” said Riley Walters, a policy analyst for Asia’s economy and technology with The Heritage Foundation. “Chinese don’t pay American taxes.”

 

Luke Coffey, China’s Arctic ambitions threaten the West, Pompeo warns in Europe, Washington Examiner

His Monday remarks could foreshadow a U.S. effort “to force China out of the region” before the Communist power establishes a major presence, as the Heritage Foundation’s Luke Coffey put it.

“China is not as involved in the region yet as it is in South Asia or in Africa, so I feel like this is a good example of the administration trying to get ahead of the problem before we go too far down the road,” said Coffey, a former senior special adviser at the United Kingdom’s Ministry of Defence.

 

James Di Pane, Sexual assault epidemic has Pentagon, military leaders on the defensive, Washington Examiner

While acknowledging there are compelling arguments for both sides, Heritage researcher James Di Pane comes down on the side of keeping the dual-hat arrangement, which he says fosters a collaborative relationship, faster decision-making, and more efficient resource allocation.

 

James Di Pane, Pentagon report lays out growing military threats from China, Politico

KEEP THE TWO HATS: The four-star in charge of both U.S. Cyber Command and the National Security Agency should continue having that dual-hatted role, according to a new report from the Heritage Foundation’s James Di Pane.

“Continuing to improve the capacity and readiness of Cyber Command is more important than organizational reshuffling for enhancing cyber security,” he writes.

 

James Di Pane, Trump’s cyber workforce order gets bipartisan praise, Politico

SPEAKING OF CYBERCOM — The four-star in charge of both Cyber Command and the NSA should continue having that dual-hatted role, according to a report from The Heritage Foundation’s James Di Pane. “Continuing to improve the capacity and readiness of Cyber Command is more important than organizational reshuffling for enhancing cyber security,” he writes.

 

Dakota Wood, Marines prep to hit the beach (but need more ships from the Navy), Navy Times

Retired Marine Lt. Col. Dakota Wood, a senior research fellow for the Heritage Foundation, routinely makes the case for more amphib ships and training to prepare the Corps for the near-peer fight.

 

Steve Bucci, The master behind the mask: who is Iran’s most feared and powerful military commander?, Fox News 

“Qassem is little known in the West because he cares nothing for fame or publicity, but everything about power and ideology,” noted Steve Bucci, a visiting fellow at The Heritage Foundation who served for three decades as an Army Special Forces officer and senior Pentagon official. “The Regime loves him; the Iranian people fear him.”

 

Thomas Spoehr, Trump taps Shanahan to be next Pentagon chief, Politico

“My sense is that he’s found his footing and that he’s gotten more comfortable in the role,” said Thomas Spoehr, a retired Army lieutenant general with the conservative Heritage Foundation.

 

Thomas Spoehr, The Pacific push: New rotation, thousands more soldiers heading to the region as the Army readies for a new kind of fight, Army Times

The Army’s push makes sense to retired Army Lt. Gen. Thomas Spoehr, director of the Center for National Defense at The Heritage Foundation.

 

Thomas Calendar, When will the US Navy be able to autonomously seek and destroy mines?,Defense News

But the cuts have been a result, at least in part, of the delays, said Thomas Callender, a retired submarine officer and analyst with The Heritage Foundation.

 

Peter Brookes, US expected to RAMP UP military preparations amid ‘threat of Iranian missile ATTACK’, Express

Military expert Peter Brookes, a senior fellow at the Heritage Foundation, said the threat could have contributed to the military activity from Iran.

 

Joel Griffith, Skeptic of Elizabeth Warren’s plan says 10 European countries scrapped wealth taxes, Politifact

In a Fox News op-ed, an analyst at the conservative Heritage Foundation noted that a wealth tax isn’t a new idea. Joel Griffith said many European nations have tried it. And scrapped it. “Of the 14 wealthy (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries with a wealth tax in 1996, 10 have since then abandoned it,” Griffith wrote April 28.

 

Bob Moffit, Support the RIP MSP Act, S. 1313 and H.R. 2524, Freedom Works

Like co-ops, the MSP was added to the ACA as a nod to the far-left when the so-called public option, a government-run health insurance program designed to undercut private health insurance, proved politically untenable. The concern, however, is that OPM could use the provision to create a public option. As the Heritage Foundation’s Robert Moffit explained, “[I]f the MSP program should fail in generating ‘competition,’ advocates of the lost ‘robust public option’ have also plainly argued that the administration and its allies can build on the ‘non-profit’ plans to recreate it.”

 

Rachel Greszler, Congress Grappling With Paid Family Leave Tug O’ War: Dems Want Federal Program, GOP Wants Tax Break, Forbes

The state programs have low usage (1% for eligible families in New Jersey) and low awareness (fewer than half of eligible workers in California), Rachel Greszler, an entitlements expert at the conservative Heritage Foundation told the Ways and Means session.

 

Rachel Greszler, Congress Grappling With Paid Family Leave Tug O’ War: Dems Want Federal Program, GOP Wants Tax Break, Forbes

The state programs have low usage (1% for eligible families in New Jersey) and low awareness (fewer than half of eligible workers in California), Rachel Greszler, an entitlements expert at the conservative Heritage Foundation told the Ways and Means session.

 

Diane Katz, Corporate Welfare Wins Again in Trump’s Washington, The New York Times 

This good news isn’t unique to Boeing. As Diane Katz of the Heritage Foundation notes, while government-backed financing for commercial aircraft shrank to 4 percent of all commercial aircraft financing in 2018 from 30 percent in 2010, sales have skyrocketed. Clearly, aircraft are not a risky export, nor are they so risky as to deter private investors.

 

Nina Schaefer, Tennessee Becomes First State to Embrace Block Grants for Medicaid Funding, The Wall Street Journal 

Nina Owcharenko Schaefer, a senior research fellow at the conservative Heritage Foundation, said decisions on Medicaid spending needed to be more local.

“Every state is different,” she said. “The statutory limits the federal government puts on is a burden. States want to tailor benefits to deliver better quality at lower cost.”

 

Paul Larkin, Driving While Stoned May Be an Insurmountable Legal Problem, Inside Science 

Setting a limit on how much should be allowed now is more of a political decision than science, said Paul Larkin, a senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation who has written frequently on the problem. The states that have set limits have picked a number that seems to be satisfactory to a large number of people.

 

Mike Gonzalez, Viktor Orbán and the corruption of conservatism, AEI

Last year, Heritage Foundation’s Mike Gonzalez wrote that the Trump administration “must befriend Hungary’s populist leader,” Viktor Orbán. “Hungary shows the West the path to survival,” claims one headline in The American Conservative magazine. Even more careful thinkers, such as Sir Roger Scruton extended a considerable degree of deference to Hungary’s Prime Minister, claiming that he was “not the kind of demagogic tyrant that the liberal establishment in Europe want to make him out to be.”

 

Lindsey Burke, Warren Has Proposed or Backed Plans Totaling Estimated $129 Trillion in Government Spending, The Washington Free Beacon

“There is one big clear winner, and that’s the universities,” Heritage Foundation education policy official Lindsey Burke told the Free Beacon.

 

Heritage, The Art of a New Iran Deal, Foreign Affairs

The administration has further boxed itself in by taking what many respondents perceive as a zero-sum approach toward Iran. Speaking to the Heritage Foundation last May, Pompeo listed 12 demands (he added a 13th, on human rights, later) for inclusion in any new deal with Iran. A number of our interviewees identified this list as the starting U.S. negotiating position, although it has never been publicly articulated as such. The demands include ceasing all uranium enrichment, ending the proliferation of ballistic missiles, releasing dual nationals held in Iranian prisons, and cutting off support for Iranian proxy groups throughout the Middle East.

 

Heritage & The Daily Signal, Fact-Checking the President in Real Time, The Atlantic

The Heritage Foundation’s Daily Signal, for example, gets a green check mark (“This website adheres to all nine of NewsGuard’s standards of credibility and transparency,” says the pop-up). Meanwhile, Breitbart News is rated “Proceed with caution” and gets a red exclamation point (“This website fails to meet several basic standards of credibility and transparency,” which are enumerated).

 

Heritage, China tops agenda as military leaders from 11 nations mull Arctic security, Stars and Stripes

During talks in Finland, the U.S. should “raise awareness of China’s questionable ambitions,” The Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank with influence in the Trump administration, said in a report ahead of the Arctic talks.

 

Heritage, Retired for 2 years, Reid finally concerned about debt, Review Journal

Without reforms, yearly federal budget deficits will soon top $1 trillion. Over the next 10 years, the Heritage Foundation projects that 84 percent of new spending will be in entitlements and interest.

 

Heritage, Why The Left Smears Conservatives Instead Of Engaging Their Ideas, The Federalist

Here again these characterizations have no basis in reality. No major right-leaning entitlement reform proposal has called for cuts to entitlements, much less for “gutting” them. Reforms put forth from Paul Ryan, the Heritage Foundation, the American Enterprise Institute, the Cato Institute, and others called for cutting not a single dollar, but for slowing their rate of growth.

 

Heritage, Understanding the Surge in Tensions with Iran, National Review

At the same time, President Trump remains open to dialogue with Iranian leaders. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced a list of twelve U.S. requirements for a new agreement with Iran on nuclear and regional issues in a May 2018 speech at the Heritage Foundation. So far, Iranian officials have shown no interest in dialogue with the U.S. and are sticking to hostile rhetoric to divide and threaten America.

 

Heritage, U.S. may deploy more weapons to the Middle East: Speed Read, Politico

The White House was right to issue the executive order on the EMP threat: The Heritage Foundation

 

Heritage, Trump and Kim battled subordinates ahead of spike in tensions, The Washington Post

Top conservative think tank scholars at the Heritage Foundation and the American Enterprise Institute have criticized the administration and called for even more economic sanctions. By contrast, many advocates of engagement and nonproliferation have offered cautious support for a step-by-step process that trades partial sanctions relief for partial denuclearization.

 

Heritage Action, Daily on Energy: Iraqi energy transition grows more urgent amid tensions with Tehran, Washington Examiner

Co-signers include FreedomWorks, Club for Growth, the Competitive Enterprise Institute, Heritage Action for America, and several others.

 

Heritage Action, Biz groups take victory lap on Ex-Im Bank, The Hill

Conservative advocacy group Heritage Action said it was “disappointed that so many in the Senate sided with foreign companies over American jobs and the American worker.”

 

Paul Winfree, White House plans next moves to fill open Fed seats, The Washington Post

Some White House advisers discussed former budget official Paul Winfree as a possible candidate to serve as a Fed governor, two people familiar with the matter said Friday, as they look to move past the firestorm of opposition that confronted two recent picks.

In a Fox News op-ed, an analyst at the conservative Heritage Foundation noted that a wealth tax isn’t a new idea. Joel Griffith said many European nations have tried it. And scrapped it. “Of the 14 wealthy (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries with a wealth tax in 1996, 10 have since then abandoned it,” Griffith wrote April 28.

 

Bob Moffit, Support the RIP MSP Act, S. 1313 and H.R. 2524, Freedom Works

Like co-ops, the MSP was added to the ACA as a nod to the far-left when the so-called public option, a government-run health insurance program designed to undercut private health insurance, proved politically untenable. The concern, however, is that OPM could use the provision to create a public option. As the Heritage Foundation’s Robert Moffit explained, “[I]f the MSP program should fail in generating ‘competition,’ advocates of the lost ‘robust public option’ have also plainly argued that the administration and its allies can build on the ‘non-profit’ plans to recreate it.”

 

Rachel Greszler, Congress Grappling With Paid Family Leave Tug O’ War: Dems Want Federal Program, GOP Wants Tax Break, Forbes

The state programs have low usage (1% for eligible families in New Jersey) and low awareness (fewer than half of eligible workers in California), Rachel Greszler, an entitlements expert at the conservative Heritage Foundation told the Ways and Means session.

 

Rachel Greszler, Congress Grappling With Paid Family Leave Tug O’ War: Dems Want Federal Program, GOP Wants Tax Break, Forbes

The state programs have low usage (1% for eligible families in New Jersey) and low awareness (fewer than half of eligible workers in California), Rachel Greszler, an entitlements expert at the conservative Heritage Foundation told the Ways and Means session.

 

Diane Katz, Corporate Welfare Wins Again in Trump’s Washington, The New York Times 

This good news isn’t unique to Boeing. As Diane Katz of the Heritage Foundation notes, while government-backed financing for commercial aircraft shrank to 4 percent of all commercial aircraft financing in 2018 from 30 percent in 2010, sales have skyrocketed. Clearly, aircraft are not a risky export, nor are they so risky as to deter private investors.

 

Nina Schaefer, Tennessee Becomes First State to Embrace Block Grants for Medicaid Funding, The Wall Street Journal 

Nina Owcharenko Schaefer, a senior research fellow at the conservative Heritage Foundation, said decisions on Medicaid spending needed to be more local.

“Every state is different,” she said. “The statutory limits the federal government puts on is a burden. States want to tailor benefits to deliver better quality at lower cost.”

 

Paul Larkin, Driving While Stoned May Be an Insurmountable Legal Problem, Inside Science 

Setting a limit on how much should be allowed now is more of a political decision than science, said Paul Larkin, a senior research fellow at the Heritage Foundation who has written frequently on the problem. The states that have set limits have picked a number that seems to be satisfactory to a large number of people.

 

Mike Gonzalez, Viktor Orbán and the corruption of conservatism, AEI

Last year, Heritage Foundation’s Mike Gonzalez wrote that the Trump administration “must befriend Hungary’s populist leader,” Viktor Orbán. “Hungary shows the West the path to survival,” claims one headline in The American Conservative magazine. Even more careful thinkers, such as Sir Roger Scruton extended a considerable degree of deference to Hungary’s Prime Minister, claiming that he was “not the kind of demagogic tyrant that the liberal establishment in Europe want to make him out to be.”

 

Lindsey Burke, Warren Has Proposed or Backed Plans Totaling Estimated $129 Trillion in Government Spending, The Washington Free Beacon

“There is one big clear winner, and that’s the universities,” Heritage Foundation education policy official Lindsey Burke told the Free Beacon.

 

Heritage, The Art of a New Iran Deal, Foreign Affairs

The administration has further boxed itself in by taking what many respondents perceive as a zero-sum approach toward Iran. Speaking to the Heritage Foundation last May, Pompeo listed 12 demands (he added a 13th, on human rights, later) for inclusion in any new deal with Iran. A number of our interviewees identified this list as the starting U.S. negotiating position, although it has never been publicly articulated as such. The demands include ceasing all uranium enrichment, ending the proliferation of ballistic missiles, releasing dual nationals held in Iranian prisons, and cutting off support for Iranian proxy groups throughout the Middle East.

 

Heritage & The Daily Signal, Fact-Checking the President in Real Time, The Atlantic

The Heritage Foundation’s Daily Signal, for example, gets a green check mark (“This website adheres to all nine of NewsGuard’s standards of credibility and transparency,” says the pop-up). Meanwhile, Breitbart News is rated “Proceed with caution” and gets a red exclamation point (“This website fails to meet several basic standards of credibility and transparency,” which are enumerated).

 

Heritage, China tops agenda as military leaders from 11 nations mull Arctic security, Stars and Stripes

During talks in Finland, the U.S. should “raise awareness of China’s questionable ambitions,” The Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank with influence in the Trump administration, said in a report ahead of the Arctic talks.

 

Heritage, Retired for 2 years, Reid finally concerned about debt, Review Journal

Without reforms, yearly federal budget deficits will soon top $1 trillion. Over the next 10 years, the Heritage Foundation projects that 84 percent of new spending will be in entitlements and interest.

 

Heritage, Why The Left Smears Conservatives Instead Of Engaging Their Ideas, The Federalist

Here again these characterizations have no basis in reality. No major right-leaning entitlement reform proposal has called for cuts to entitlements, much less for “gutting” them. Reforms put forth from Paul Ryan, the Heritage Foundation, the American Enterprise Institute, the Cato Institute, and others called for cutting not a single dollar, but for slowing their rate of growth.

 

Heritage, Understanding the Surge in Tensions with Iran, National Review

At the same time, President Trump remains open to dialogue with Iranian leaders. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced a list of twelve U.S. requirements for a new agreement with Iran on nuclear and regional issues in a May 2018 speech at the Heritage Foundation. So far, Iranian officials have shown no interest in dialogue with the U.S. and are sticking to hostile rhetoric to divide and threaten America.

 

Heritage, U.S. may deploy more weapons to the Middle East: Speed Read, Politico

The White House was right to issue the executive order on the EMP threat: The Heritage Foundation

 

Heritage, Trump and Kim battled subordinates ahead of spike in tensions, The Washington Post

Top conservative think tank scholars at the Heritage Foundation and the American Enterprise Institute have criticized the administration and called for even more economic sanctions. By contrast, many advocates of engagement and nonproliferation have offered cautious support for a step-by-step process that trades partial sanctions relief for partial denuclearization.

 

Heritage Action, Daily on Energy: Iraqi energy transition grows more urgent amid tensions with Tehran, Washington Examiner

Co-signers include FreedomWorks, Club for Growth, the Competitive Enterprise Institute, Heritage Action for America, and several others.

 

Heritage Action, Biz groups take victory lap on Ex-Im Bank, The Hill

Conservative advocacy group Heritage Action said it was “disappointed that so many in the Senate sided with foreign companies over American jobs and the American worker.”

 

Paul Winfree, White House plans next moves to fill open Fed seats, The Washington Post

Some White House advisers discussed former budget official Paul Winfree as a possible candidate to serve as a Fed governor, two people familiar with the matter said Friday, as they look to move past the firestorm of opposition that confronted two recent picks.

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