Heritage Foundation expert Mike Gonzalez’s newest book, “A Race for the Future: How Conservatives Can Break the Liberal Monopoly on Hispanic Americans,” hits bookstores today.

Here’s the Daily Signal’s exclusive first look at his book, including an excerpt.

The early reviews are positive. Here’s what William McGurn has to say in the New York Post:

Now he has put his thoughts together in an extraordinary book called “A Race for the Future,” which goes on sale Tuesday. It’s Paul Ryan’s economics and Charles Murray’s sociology applied to the Hispanic experience.

His argument? That the American future conservatives hope for will largely depend on the future of Hispanic America.

Gonzalez comes out swinging. The whole concept of “Hispanic,” he points out, didn’t even exist before the 1970s.

It is an artificial identity, created by the federal government to paper over the huge differences among Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Salvadorans, Mexicans, Guatemalans and lump them into one category.

Be sure to order your copy today!

 

 

Here are some of the top news stories featuring The Heritage Foundation from the last week.

50 Outlets Cover Heritage’s Immigration Event with Rick Perry

Twenty-two news cameras recorded our event with Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a new Heritage record. His remarks on immigration were featured in over 50 major outlets including The Wall Street JournalThe New York Times, and The Washington Post.

The New York Times on Heritage and Cronyism

Republicans who are pushing back say the agency is an example of corporate welfare and “crony capitalism,” a view held by conservative organizations like the Heritage Foundation, putting these groups at odds with business lobbies like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Did you see other Heritage experts in the news?

Top-notch policy research only goes so far. So to make the case for conservative policies to the American people, Heritage experts take to the news media. Here are some examples of articles by our experts this week.

Jim Carafano on Iraq in the McClatchy Tribune News Wire

The best way to start winning a war is to stop losing. That axiom certainly applies to what’s going on in Iraq. But, that said, there is no place for American brigades in this battle.

This article was republished in 12 news outlets.

Diane Katz on the Export-Import Bank in The Clarion-Ledger

Congress is debating the fate of the U.S. Export-Import Bank, and obscure government agency that funnels subsidies to foreign firms for the purchase of American exports. Proponents claim the bank aids small business, creates jobs and “levels the playing field” in global trade. In fat, Ex-Im does nothing of the kind, and Americans deserve to know the truth about what is little more than a conduit for corporate welfare.

Ryan Anderson on Marriage in The Philadelphia Inquirer

News about court cases that involve same-sex marriages usually travels fast. But when a judge in Tennessee recently upheld that state’s constitutional authority to define marriage as the union of a man and a woman, it went almost unnoticed.

 

The Heritage Foundation uses the news media to advance conservative principles and shape the national debate. Here are some of the media outlets Heritage was mentioned in over the past week.

The Heritage Foundation in The Blaze

The Heritage Foundation is pushing to let Ex-Im expire, arguing that the bank will inevitably lose money (as it did in the 1980s) and saying that most of the bank’s financing goes to help mega-corporations, such as aerospace giant Boeing, not U.S. small businesses.

Steven Bucci in The Washington Times

Steven Bucci, a former Pentagon official and analyst at the Heritage Foundation, said the beheading and threats have proved to be “a wake-up call” that poses risks to the Islamic State.

The Index of Economic Freedom in Newsweek

Earlier this year, The Heritage Foundation ranked Estonia as the 11th best economy in the world. The country has the same population as Dallas.

There’s a looming problem in America’s federal criminal justice system that “gravely threatens the liberty of ordinary citizens. It’s called overcriminalization.

The problem, law professor Stephen Smith writes in a new Heritage report, “is not simply that too many criminal laws are on the books, but that they are poorly defined in ways that give unwarranted sweep to the criminal law, raising the danger of punishment absent or in excess of moral blameworthiness.”

Congress has created, on average, 56 new federal crimes each year since 2000. This has contributed injustices “that federal prosecutors have committed against people who had no reason to know their actions were wrongful, much less illegal.”

While awareness of this problem is growing, legislation to properly deal with the problem has yet to be written. Smith explains an alternative solution: Continue Reading »

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