January 10, 2013

More than 70 percent of federal money goes to programs that create dependency on government, Heritage Foundation economist Bill Beach explained Tuesday on Fox Business.

According to a recent report Beach coauthored with Heritage’s Patrick Tyrrell:

  • 128 million Americans now receive benefits from one or more federal assistance program. That’s more than 41 percent of the population.
  • Between 1988 and 2011, the amount of the U.S. population that receives assistance from the federal government grew by 62 percent.

In fact, these numbers may underestimate the scope of the problem. They explain that the Census Bureau Current Population Survey is “well known to undercount those receiving Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, State Children’s Health Insurance, higher-education support, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families.”

Every year, Heritage publishes the Index of Dependence on Government to provide lawmakers with accurate information about the number of Americans who rely on government.

How do you think we can address government dependency?

Comments (1)

historianMI - January 15, 2013

It makes me very angry when some scribbler or blabber puts me in the same category as the dope addicted welfare client. I began paying into “Social Security” when I
was 17, and paid until I was 62 1/2. The tax wasn’t credited to my retirement until I was about 32, it was just down the drain. And if my total income on the 1040 exceeds a certain amount, I pay a TAX on the “excess.”
So DON’T PUT ME DOWN AS A DEPENDENT ON THE GOVERNMENT. I paid in for 47 years. If I receive more than I paid in, I feel I’m still ahead of the illegal aliens who are here illegally, and who put their mouths into the public trough with ever contributing anything to the funding.

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