June 6, 2014


Heritage Foundation expert Lindsey Burke told Fox Business’ John Stossel the problem with national standards in education last night:

The type of uniformity that Common Core or national standards creates assumes there is one best way for children to learn and it assumes we know what that one best way is. But every child is different. Every child has unique learning needs.

Burke quotes parents speaking out against Common Core: “What we’re seeing our kids bring home is total nonsense”.

Three states have now dropped out of Common Core as Americans realize its flaws: South Carolina and Oklahoma this week joined Indiana in withdrawing.

Read more Heritage research on Education here.

Watch the whole video above then tell us in the comments: Do you think Common Core is total nonsense?

Comments (17)

Jan - June 12, 2014

It sounds like nonsense to me, but let’s not just call it “nonsense” because it’s more dangerous than that and needs to be buried with Stalin and Marx and Lenin.

Bruce Braun - June 12, 2014

Common Core is another way the goverment is teaching our Children Propaganda that the ways of the past have to change and all have to be equal. Was this not how Hitler and other tyrants changed their children to be equal. Look what happened to the parents and family unites.
Wake up or we will turn out the same, stop this now!!!

Gerald Potts - June 12, 2014

If the math example is a representative example, then Common Core appears to not be a step forward, and likely will cause children to lose interest in learning. The math example, while technically sound, is a laborious exercise, compared to the much simpler and straight-forward/quicker conventional method. I would not be interested in having my children suffer through Common Core.

Jim Rauh - June 12, 2014

There is no way anyone could do simple math – even addition – in their head based on the way this is being taught – total nonsense (politely)! This will only push our children further behind other countries in basic education.

BETTY L REAUME - June 12, 2014

Lindsay hit it on the head. Every child is different. Only the
teacher knows when a child is having difficulty. She or he should then adapt her method to fit the child’s need. Commoncore is not needed and is too costly.

susan miller - June 12, 2014

Common core is total nonsense. I have talked to a 6th
grader that thought it was boring and said it makes you dumber because it’s only to make the teacher look better and you will not be equipped for college. So if a kid that young tells you that, what can I say. So I hope the states
wake up before it’s to late and stop trying to take away individualism and make everyone equal. Susan Miller 6-12-14

Deanna Ryan - June 12, 2014

This example is the most convoluted approach to multiplication that I have ever come across. Children do not all learn the same nor do they understand all examples equally. Teachers need to be prepared to present math to all students in order for them to learn math problems. I especially find the “math terminology” which they are constantly changing difficult for adults to be able to help their children as they didn’t learn using the new math terms.

Mary Bird - June 12, 2014

It IS Nonsense!

Mary Bird - June 12, 2014

I agree It IS nonsense!

Douglas Perle - June 12, 2014

As with anything the Government has done in the last 70 years with the exception of World War ll, they have failed.
To standardize mediocrity in America is just another way to create American third world standards. Every State should be ashamed for taking the Federal bribe monies and those people should be fired from Government at the State and Federal levels. The only way to create excellence is to diversify each and every States Education. Divide education into creating goal oriented success. Not every American wants or needs to go to a College. Trail the majority for work. Colleges produce as many drop outs as our public schools these days. Government calls it education when half of those people can’t even read coming out of High School! Governments involvement in education is proof that they should not be involved in anything other than protecting the boarders and protecting Americans.

denison barber - June 12, 2014

I have been involved in education for over 50 years from grade 7 to college level-including chairman of board of education. I now correct “common core” tests. We do not need national standards for education. National standards are far too open to being used for “indoctrination” Too many nations have used their education system to indoctrinate kids with values we don’t want for our children.

marjie saite - June 12, 2014

Also read Lindsey Burke’s 6-14-13 “Head Start’s Sad and Costly Secret – - What Washington Doesn’t Want You to Know”. 2 quotes from her article to share with anyone singing the praises of Common Core:
1. “Head Start fails children and costs taxpayers exorbitant amounts of money every year. And it’s just one of 69 federal preschool programs.”
2. “Head Start fails children and costs taxpayers exorbitant amounts of money every year. And it’s just one of 69 federal preschool programs.”

Mary A Cole - June 12, 2014

The Common Core materials were developed by non-educators and have not been tested before being distributed nationally. That makes all kids in the nation who are subject to Common Core guinea pigs. All trained educators know that there are many ways to learn and not all ways work for any one student. My son, a genius, and one of my very bright brothers hated school–before Common Core. My son refused to do all the homework so that he would have time to pursue his own interest of helping to develop Linux and Inkscape. He had a “B” average. My brother dropped out and joined the army and took the GED. Kids like my son and me and all my brothers would be screamingly bored in Common Core. The best schools and teachers in my
county are in my area. The best teachers are resigning. One said that she could not look her kids in the eye as she knew that, with Common Core, she was not giving the kids what they need to succeed. I am going to vote for the candidate for governor who was once a school principal and who wants to get our state out of Common Core.

Elisa desGroseilliers - June 12, 2014

Common Core will further dumb down our children. It is an absolute disappointment that Governor Jan Brewer and Superintendent Huppenthal agreed to implement this curriculum. Don’t know if they bothered to read and research this curriculum in depth before signing on.. Politics came into play, it seems, and the only ones who stand to gain with this is Bill Gates and Craig Barrett, former CEO of Intel, not our children and grandchildren. They will be supplying all the schools with the necessary computer technology to fulfill this curriculum. Again, follow the money.

John Hazeltine - June 13, 2014

At the core of this debate is whether parents or the state should have the greater power over what and where children learn. The best answer isn’t common core standards and tests. It is vouchers allowing millions of parents, who know their children best, to decide where they will best learn according to their abilities. A free market in education will allow innovative and more effective practices and practitioners to rise, with creative destruction for inferior models.

TP Tytula - June 13, 2014

Common core has nothing to do with the way things are taught. That remains in the hands of local school boards. It deals ONLY with the results. They are standards for resulting performance.

Leila Langston - June 15, 2014

Common Core needlessly complicates what are relatively simple and straightforward math concepts. I was an elementary school teacher many years ago. I’ve seen a lot of educational fads come and go. My daughter is a teacher now. We both cringe when we see the convoluted ways Common Core presents math to the students.

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