July 2, 2014

The Heritage Foundation’s Edwin Meese Center for Legal and Judicial Studies played a behind-the-scenes supporting role in twelve significant Supreme Court cases this term advancing limited government, religious freedom, and property rights—and the parties Heritage worked with won in all 12 cases.

Heritage assisted in several ways, including helping the litigants solicit amicus curiae (“friend of the court”) briefs from other interested parties or hosting moot court practice sessions for the oral advocates prior to their Supreme Court arguments.

Jordan Lorence, the Senior Counsel at Alliance Defending Freedom, recently explained Heritage’s crucial role:

Preparing attorneys for their important oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court is one of the significant things done by Heritage’s Center for Legal and Judicial Studies. These practice sessions (called, “moot courts”) at Heritage have become over the years a must stop for anyone arguing a case before the Supreme Court promoting limited government, ordered liberty and a proper interpretation of the Constitution.  . . .  Because Heritage understands how the Supreme Court works, they can help others with their important cases there. The work of Heritage setting up moot courts and amicus coordination may not be prominent, but it is important, and it has been making a difference at the Supreme Court since 1994.

What do you think of the Supreme Court’s decisions this year?

Comments (18)

Andrew Ellis - July 3, 2014

The Illegal children that have been brought into the US and bust around by the American government and hous’ed also by the US government is illegal trafficking by the US government of little children this is against the law his or any way the president can be taken to the Supreme Court for breaking the law sincerely yours Andrew

William Gillham - July 3, 2014

Boehner or someone needs to petition the Court to stop Obama and his czars unconstitutional exercise of legislative powers! Everybody complains, but nobody does anything about it.

Don Volz - July 3, 2014

I’m gratified by the number of 9-0 decisions against government overreach, but I’m equally alarmed by the number of 5-4 rulings in cases like Hobby Lobby v Burwell, which should have been a slam dunk It’s frightening that four SCOTUS justices are so willing to ignore, misconstrue, and/or misrepresent, facts in forming their opinions.

It’s clear that conservatives must regain control of the Senate in 2014 to prevent the appointment of additional left-wing ideologues to the SCOTUS bench.

curtis hicks - July 3, 2014

So far the court done one thing right to vote against Obama’s forcing the religious their rights. Wish John Roberts would of denied Obama care. But maybe it can happen now. We need the courts to give the people are constitution justice. We need justice impeachment to Obama and his administration. Too clean up this wrong governments. Obama don’t have a right to destroy America or braking laws and murder scandals. He should be impeached

Joseph K. McKennan - July 3, 2014

a day late and a dollar short. Thanks for nothing.

Ellen Elmore - July 3, 2014

After the shock of the Supreme Court upholding the legality of Obamacare, I was pleasantly surprised by their ruling for religious liberty in the Hobby Lobby case. I guess they finally “saw the light” and decided they were no longer afraid of what Obama would do if they ruled against his landmark piece of legislation.

Lew Backer - July 3, 2014

I’m not sure if it was this year, but when the Supreme Court ruled that Obamacare was constitutional I believe it will be judged in history as one of the worst court decisions ever. John Roberts should not be able to sleep well at night knowing that he rolled over for the worst president this country has ever seen, and knowing that the law was passed by only the Democratic party majority using less than ethical tactics.

Jerry Metcalf - July 3, 2014

The SCOTUS got some things right, Hobby Lobby and home care not paying unions. WE can only hope for the future.

Glory Aiken - July 3, 2014

Will President Obama’s recess appointments to the NLRB be forced to resign ? If not what will be the result of the Supreme Court ruling ?

Orval Wood - July 3, 2014

I think they show some improvement.

Dennis Rethmeier - July 4, 2014

Thank you Heritage Foundation for helping SCOTUS get it right on theses recent decisions!

Al from Fl - July 4, 2014

Happy the court ruled in favor of religious freedom but very concerned about the 5-4 decisions. It suggests that four of the justices have a very different view of the constitution than I think was envisioned by our Founding Fathers. How do U.S. citizens develop such a foreign view and rationale as demonstrated by these four justices and many (all?) progressives.

Joseph J. Dulka - July 5, 2014

So far so good. Of great concern for the future is the quality of new justices that may be appointed.

pat plesh - July 7, 2014

I am deeply concerned with the narrow margin of the voting! To think that we could get one more liberal progressive judge appointed is very scary!
Chief Justice Roberts has been a huge disappointment and it seems the political arm has the ability to pressure him into submission.

Jeanne Sella - July 7, 2014

I’ve been DELIGHTED but somewhat surprised!
Jeanne

Stimmel, Marcie - July 7, 2014

Thank the Lord the right margin was achieved…and thank you Heritage for your good work for the Constitution…yes the court’s makeup is shaky….it’s so much about living up to the law and what is right and not what someone thinks!!!!…MMS

Bill - July 10, 2014

Decisions without resulting actions are worthless! For example, the NLRB recess appointments “ruled” unconstitutional should REQUIRE immediate replacement. Those appointments are supposed to “expire at the end of the at the end of their next session” Article II section 2. Where is the enforcement?

Marti - July 15, 2014

Thank you for all that you do for our conservative cause.

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